Why is Laparoscopic Surgery performed?

Why laparoscopic surgery performed?

In laparoscopic surgery, the doctor makes some small cuts. Normally, each unit is no more than a half-inch long. (This is why it’s sometimes called named keyhole surgery operation.) The surgeon inserts the tube pipe through each passage, and the camera and surgical instruments get through those. With traditional conventional methods, you might spend one week or more at the hospital for an intestinal operation, and the overall healing might take 4 to 8 weeks. If you take laparoscopic surgery, you might stay just 2 nights at the hospital and recover in 2 or 3 weeks. And the less hospital stays mostly costs are less.

Laparoscopy surgery is often used to identify and diagnose the source of pelvic or abdominal pain. It’s usually performed when noninvasive methods are unable to help with diagnosis.


In many cases, abdominal problems can also be diagnosed with imaging techniques such as:
1) Ultrasound, which uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the body
2) CT scan, which is a series of special X-rays that take cross-sectional images of the body
3) MRI scan, which uses magnets and radio waves to produce images of the body.


Laparoscopy is performed when these tests don’t provide enough information or insight for a diagnosis. The procedure may also be used to take a biopsy, or sample of tissue, from a particular organ in the abdomen.